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Essential Oil of the Week: Bergamot

Posted on November 19, 2014 by Emily Villanueva
Bergamot is one of the most popular oils in the fragrance industry. It is derived from the fruit peel or rind of the bergamot fruit, which is actually inedible. It is in the citrus family of scents, but is a tinge more spicy and floral than the orange, lemon, or grapefruit. It is considered one of the "all-important" top notes in perfumes and colognes, and was considered a trendy personal fragrance during the Napoleonic times.
Italy and Mediterranean countries are the biggest producers of bergamot. It is thought that Columbus found the bergamot tree in the Canary Islands and brought it back to Italy. Bergamot has many household and culinary uses; for example, it is the reason for Earl Grey Tea's distinct flavor (black tea + bergamot essential oil = Early Grey Tea)! It is also a popular air freshener and potpourri ingredient, and used in Traditional Chinese Medicine to assist the flow of vital energy. 
Medicinally, it has been documented to fight heartburn, upset stomachs, digestive issues, sleeplessness, and oily or troubled skin. It is also purportedly great for those suffering from depression and anxiety too, as its scent is simultaneously relaxing and uplifting. 

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Essential Oil of the Week: Benzoin Styrax

Posted on November 01, 2014 by Emily Villanueva

Benzoin oil has a sweet, warm and vanilla-like aroma and is golden brown in color, with a treacle-like viscosity.

The essential oil is extracted from the Styrax Benzoin tree, which is from Java, Sumatra and Thailand and grows to 8 meters (20 feet). Deep incisions are made in the trunk of the tree, from which the grayish colored sap exudes. When the resinous lump becomes hard and brittle, it is collected from the bark.

Benzoin, also known as gum Benjamin, is one of the classic ingredients of incense. In ancient civilizations it was used in fumigation and it is also an ingredient of 'Friar's balsam', an aid to respiratory problems. It is also used as a fixative in the perfume industry.

The therapeutic properties of benzoin oil include the following; antiseptic, anti-depressant, astringent, anti-inflammatory, carminative, cordial, deodorant, diuretic, expectorant, sedative and vulnerary.

Benzoin oil's greatest benefit lies in that it has a calming effect on the nervous and digestive systems, a warming effect on circulation problems and a toning effect on the respiratory tract.

It furthermore boosts the pancreas, which in turns helps digestion, and is thought to be involved in controlling blood sugar, which makes it valuable for sufferers of diabetes.

The effect it has on the skin is to improve elasticity, helping cracked skin, while aiding the healing of sores and wounds and at the same time reducing redness, irritation and itching.

via www.essentialoils.co.za.

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Essential Oil of the Week: Armoise Mugwort

Posted on October 10, 2014 by Emily Villanueva

 

Armoise Mugwort, or Artimisia Alba, originated in India and Morocco. Its essential oil is steam distilled from the leaves and flowers of the mugwort plant, a very popular plant for medicinal purposes with reddish purple stems and reddish brown flowers that sprout in the summer.

The color of Armoise Mugwort essential oil is usually dark yellow and of thin consistency, and it has a really strong and powerful aroma-- fresh, green, camphoraceous, and almost bittersweet. Because of this, it blends well with other herbaceous oils like patchouli, lavender, rosemary, and pine.

It is reputed to have anti-spasmodic, carminative, diuretic, and stimulant 

Blends well with: Patchouli, Lavender, Rosemary, Pine, Clary Sage and Cedarwood .

Common Uses: The chemical structure of Armoise Mugwort includes thujone, and is reputed to have anti-spasmodic, carminative, diuretic, and stimulant properties. Historically, it has been used to expel worms, control fever and for digestive disturbances.

History: Also known as White Wormwood, the herb has been used throughout Europe, Asia, and the Mediterranean basin.

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Essential Oil of the Week: Anise

Posted on September 19, 2014 by Cyndi Berglund
Anise essential oil has a long and interesting history. King Edward IV used it to perfume his clothing and Pliny the Elder (author of the first encyclopedia) claimed it prevented bad dreams. It was used to help fund the repairs for the London Bridge and to flavor food in the Middle Ages. Currently, it is used as a flavoring agent for liquors and natural mouthwashes. 
Anise oil is thin and clear, and extracted through steam distillation of dried anise fruit (or Pimpinella Anisum as it is botanically known). It has been cultivated in Egypt for over 4,000 years. It comes from the parsley family, and has the flavor of black licorice-- rich, sweet, and slightly spicy. Because of this, it pairs well with sharp, herbaceous notes like clary sage, cedarwood, lavender, and bergamot.
The oil has many therapeutic benefits. It has been said to aid bronchitis, arthritis, rheumatism, indigestion, and respiratory problems. Anise is a well-known carminative and expectorant. For example, you can mix 5 drops of anise essential oil with almond oil and rub on your stomach for cramps, or on your neck for sneezing and whooping cough. High doses or excessive usage is discouraged, however, because it can be a strong narcotic.
 Also, feel free to shoot us an email at info@tijon.com.

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Science Says That Pleasant Scents Make Us Seem More Attractive

Posted on September 17, 2014 by Emily Villanueva

 

     We already know that scent plays the most important role in attracting mates, but do we know why? New research from the Monell Chemical Senses Center found that people find faces more attractive when in the presence of pleasant odors because they tap into a certain part of the brain that processes emotional evaluation and neural processing. Odor pleasantness and facial attractiveness are directly integrated.
     In the study, 18 adults were asked to rate the attractiveness of faces in photographs. Meanwhile, different blends of fish oil and rose oil were released, ranging from strongly fishy to strongly rosy. Unsurprisingly, faces were rated more attractive when being rated while smelling the rose odor. This is because attractiveness is an emotional process-- not rational-- meaning that attractiveness is more about the judging person's mood and emotions (subjective), then how the judged person actually looks (objective). And emotions are heavily influenced by smell. When you are smelling sweet things, you are instantly put in a better mood, and thus more likely to judge people favorably. 
     Moral of the story? Smelling good is a scientific way to enhance your attractiveness. So spray some perfume on those pulse points and watch the admirers line up.

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